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Showing posts from September, 2017

Jean-Jacques Schuhl - Consisting of memories, mixing real and invented people and events, Ingrid Caven reveals the cold heart of the European counterculture of the 1970s, an era of celebrity glitz, cocaine-fueled excess, gay bathhouses, and young idealists-turned-terrorists

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Jean-Jacques Schuhl,Ingrid Caven: A Novel, Trans. by Michael Pye, City Lights Publishers, 2004.


A novel about the life of German cabaret singer and film actress Ingrid Caven, who was once director Rainer Werner Fassbinder's star, and his wife, muse to Yves Saint Laurent, and a protege of Pierre Berge. Consisting of memories, mixing real and invented people and events, Ingrid Caven reveals the cold heart of the European counterculture of the 1970s, an era of celebrity glitz, cocaine-fueled excess, gay bathhouses, and young idealists-turned-terrorists. Ingrid Caven was an immediate bestseller in France, where it sold over 235,000 copies in its first year of publication. It has been translated into 18 languages.




"Adolf Hitler, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Yves Saint Laurent – German-born cabaret singer Ingrid Caven's life flowed around these icons of 20th century European counterculture.... a collage of that strange postwar period in Europe of high artifice, drugs, terrorism, l…

Brian Willems at how nonsense and sense exist together in science fiction, the way that language is not a guarantee of personhood, the role of vision in relation to identity formation, the difference between metamorphosis and modulation...

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Brian Willems, Speculative Realism and Science Fiction, Edinburgh University Press, 2017.


Imagines the end of anthropocentrism through contemporary science fiction and speculative realism
A human-centred approach to the environment is leading to ecological collapse. One of the ways that speculative realism challenges anthropomorphism is by taking non-human things to be as valid objects of investivation as humans, allowing a more responsible and truthful view of the world to take place.


One of the reasons that speculative materialism challenges anthropomorphism is that a human-centred approach to the environment is leading to ecological collapse. Therefore, when non-human things are taken to be as equally valid objects of investigation as humans, a more responsible and truthful view of the world takes place. Brian Willems draws on the science fiction of Cormac McCarthy, Paolo Bacigalupi, Neil Gaiman, China Mieville, Doris Lessing and Kim Stanley Robinson alongside speculative material…

Russell Persson - The Narváez expedition continues to be a failed one, of course, but getting lost in Russell Persson’s strange language feels like a beautiful and hallucinatory triumph

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Russell Persson, The Way of Florida, Little Island Press, 2017.

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www.russellpersson.com

Relentless, urgent and above all musical, this expertly crafted début novel recasts the tragic story of the failed Narváez expedition – a calamitous attempt to establish Spanish colonies along the Gulf Coast – in bracing, beautiful language. A timely narrative of botched colonialism, The Way of Florida radically reimagines the parameters and responsibilities of the historical novel.
Russell Persson revisits the ill-fated Narváez expedition of the sixteenth century, which saw a group of some 600 Spanish, Greek, and Portuguese explorers arrive on the coast of Florida intent on establishing preliminary colonial settlements and garrisons. Of the 300 sent inland to explore, only four survived an eight-year ordeal: three minor members of the Spanish nobility and an enslaved Moor. Their story comes down to us via La Relación, the official report compiled by one of the nobles, published in 1542, as we…

Olivia Locher - In Ohio it’s illegal to disrobe in front of a man’s portrait. In Arizona you may not have more than two dildos in a house

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Olivia Locher, I Fought the LawForeword by Kenneth Goldsmith, Interviewer Eric Shiner,Chronicle Books, 2017.


Strange, outdated laws from each of the 50 U.S. states—some overturned, some still on the books, and some merely the stuff of legends—are depicted with sly wit by Olivia Locher. Incisive, ironic, and gorgeous, these images will appeal to art buffs and trivia fans alike. A foreword from American poet Kenneth Goldsmith and an interview with the artist by Eric Shiner, former director of the Andy Warhol Museum, contextualize rising-star Locher's photography. From serving wine in teacups in Kansas to licking a toad in Kentucky or perming a child's hair in Nebraska, breaking the law has never looked so good.


In Arizona you may not have more than two dildos in a house
In Delaware it's illegal to consume perfume
In Hawaii coins are not allowed to be placed in ones ears
In Idaho it's illegal to be nude outdoors, even on private property
In Indiana it’s illegal for a man to…

Writers Who Love Too Much : New Narrative Writing 1977-1997 - a major anthology of New Narrative, the movement fueled by punk, pop, porn, French theory, and social struggle to change writing forever

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Writers Who Love Too Much : New Narrative Writing 1977-1997,
ed. by Dodie Bellamy and Kevin Killian, Nightboat Books, 2017.




In the twenty years that followed America's bicentennial, narrative writing was re-formed, reflecting new political and sexual realities. With the publication of this anthology, the New Narrative era bounds back to life, ripe with dramatic propulsion and infused with the twin strains of poetry and Continental theory. Arranged chronologically, the reader will discover classic texts of New Narrative from Bob Gluck to Kathy Acker, and rare materials including period interviews, reviews, essays, and talks combined to form a new map of late twentieth-century creative rebellion.


Contributors: STEVE ABBOTT ** KATHY ACKER ** MICHAEL AMNASAN ** ROBERTO BEDOYA ** BRUCE BENDERSON ** CHARLES BERNSTEIN ** NAYLAND BLAKE ** BRUCE BOONE ** LAWRENCE BRAITHWAITE ** REBECCA BROWN ** KATHE BURKHART **MARSHA CAMPBELL ** DENNIS COOPER ** SAM D’ALLESANDRO ** GABRIELLE DANIELS ** LE…

Artur Lundquist - "the hallucinatory memoir of a poet in a coma.". He attempted to re-capture the now-elusive dream visions that illuminated the two months of his coma as well as to set down the waking dreams that he experienced during the first year of his convalescence, intense and vivid ones in which his eyes remained open and during which reality mixed with unreality in a half-aware reverie

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Artur Lundquist, Journeys in Dream and Imagination,Trans. by Ann B. Weissmann and Annika Planck, Four Walls, Eight Windows, 1991.


In 1981 the author, a well-known 75 year old Swedish poet, suffered a heart attack and lay comatose for two months. He then began a prolonged period during which he gradually recovered all of his faculties. In the early stage of his recovery, Lundkvist experienced a series of strange and intense "waking dreams," which he describes in this memoir. Many were dreams of journeys to real or fantastic places: for example, a trip to a railroad station in Chicago where physicians surgically transformed white people into black people, or a visit to a strange planet where cows produced blue milk. Lundkvist's memories of these dreams are embedded in a series of imaginative meditations on aging, human nature, the meaning of life, and the inexorable passage of time.


This short book is accurately subtitled "the hallucinatory memoir of a poet in a coma…